5 Best USB Bitcoin Miners 2020 – Reviews & Buying Guide

My career isn’t always dangerous, but clients can be unpredictable

My name is Amy, and I’m what’s called a Computer Dominatrix. My clients are all long distance, we never interact face-to-face, and I have control over all of them. Some give me absolute control, some give me specific portions with boundaries. Some are married or dating, others are single. They all make use of my talents to give up control of at least part of their lives.
When a new client contacts me, we exchange a few messages so I have some background about them, and I lay out what my services usually entail. I tell a few stories of what other clients have asked me to do for them, to help the new client select scenarios they would like to set up. Most of my clients have never had a Digital Dom before. So, giving them a few examples and options helps bolster their confidence.
The usual set-up goes like this: my client installs some spyware on their computer that I control. It gives me the power to do things like lock their computer, see their screen, disable the keyboard, take over control of their computer, and get reports of what they’re doing on their computer. With this tool, I can perform my services.
Some clients want me to watch their bank statements and shame them if they spend too much money or buy surprise things with their money as if I own the account. Other clients want me to monitor their porn usage and shame them for what they look up. Or, if I log in and catch them using porn, I should direct them to different porn of my choosing and force them to watch that instead. One even wanted me to try and break into his computer and install the spyware secretly. That was a fun client to work with.
When it comes down to it, they just want to relinquish a little control over their lives. I understand where their desires come from, and knowing it helps me be a better Dom.
Contrasting the fun times of my career, I’ve had a few mishaps and horrible things happen.
I had one client sign up for my services. We messaged a few times to get to know one another before I agreed to accept him as a client. He was in his mid thirties, single, and wanted me to watch him look at porn and make random comments on the things he was watching.
Really, not that abnormal for my choice of career.
I had him sign an agreement that helps me avoid legal trouble if they try to report me for hacking (had this happen before), and we got started. I gave him the url where he could install my personal spyware, and he followed through.
He only asked that I give him a little advance notice before I start watching, which I agreed to. Boundaries are important.
I would check up on him twice a week, and send him a message before I did saying “I’m coming to check on you in ten minutes, you better be watching something good.” I would log in ten minutes later to the second and start either shaming him for his choice of videos or praise him for making the “right” choice. All of this was predetermined.
Things were going fine with this client, and I balanced him with about 10 others. Being a Digital Dom makes it easy to spread your attention across many clients. Bonus if you can get clients from different time zones so they would log in at different times so you don’t have to multitask.
I was about to check in with another client, when I mis-clicked in my software. See, my spyware (which I paid to be custom written after wishing for more features in commercial tools) lists my clients by most recently connected in one screen. When I add a new client, it can mess with the order of the page I am so used to mindlessly clicking through. I’ve since paid for that to get fixed and sort clients alphabetically, but this time I made a mistake.
I clicked on this new client and connected to his computer.
A gasp escaped my lips as I saw what he was looking at. I’ll leave that up to your imagination. It was some of the most fucked up porn I’ve ever seen. Involving victims of questionable age. And blood.
If I could have slipped out of there, I would have. But this client requested a popup to appear whenever I connected so he would know I was there.
That popup revealed my unexpected presence.
Instead of panicking and trying to close the window, he calmly moved his mouse to the task bar and opened a text document. I was frozen while watching him type. I should have logged straight out, but I instead started to open a voice channel to tell him I was dropping him as a client.
It was too much for me, and I decided to set that boundary early on in my career.
“Like what you see?”
He had typed into the word document, and the cursor blinked impatiently at me.
I thought my voice would crack, so I took over the keyboard and typed back.
“I’m sorry, but I’m going to refund your money and no longer service you. Please uninstall this software and watch for your refund.”
He paused for a while, and I waited for him to respond once before I disconnected. He took too long, so I closed the window and took a deep breath while sitting back.
I was feeling really disconcerted from what I’d watched. It wasn’t the first time a client had tried to show me illegal things during a session, but it always makes me sick when they do. I gave the reins over to another Digital Dom I have partnered with. We take over for each other if we feel ill or something. Just temporarily.
I went to take a shower to wash out those images.
 
My computer started acting up more than a month later. So much had gone on since dropping that client that I didn’t connect the two at first.
The computer would slow down for a few minutes, then resume its normal speed. I assumed it was because I hadn’t restarted in a while, so I restarted it. That seemed to fix the problem.
When I had rebooted, the wifi slowed down considerably, enough for my roommate, Jess, to ask if I was downloading anything big. I had logged into the router to see if that also needed to be restarted when I noticed a device I didn’t recognize was connected to the wifi.
I swallowed hard.
RASPI was the name of the connected device. It had connected to the network three days ago.
Some strangers' device was on our network. And they had to be nearby, at least within range of wifi. I immediately suspected that a neighbor had brute forced our wifi password and was now stealing internet.
Before kicking the device off, I looked at the router’s traffic report. The device had a significant size of traffic in the last few days, but my computer used the most out of all of our devices. The device came in 5th place for most data used.
It made sense that my computer was using so much bandwidth, but 75+ gigabytes in 3 days was excessive.
My throat seized, and I immediately reached around to the back of my computer and unplugged the ethernet cable.
Deep, primal panic set in. This was a very specific attack. It’s not the kind of hacking you can do en masse to install some ransomware or adware.
Someone was targeting me or both of us.
Someone who was willing to spend time brute forcing a wifi password and going after one specific machine on the network.
 
I called Lucas, the guy I hired to write my spyware for me, and filled him in on everything I knew. He knows perfectly well what his software is used for and isn’t weird about it. He agreed to take a look at my computer for a fee.
So, trusting him as I have all my career, I installed a commercial remote desktop tool and let him connect. The moment I reconnected the computer to the internet, the router showed a spike in traffic again.
I had him on a call while he worked, and I watched what he did carefully, trying my best to learn what he was doing so I could troubleshoot myself if this ever happened again.
“Oh shit,” Lucas muttered. He had a traffic analyzer and computer process analyzer open on-screen. “Amy, I think you got hacked. Like, they’re downloading your hard drive!”
“They’re what?!” I began to really panic. I had a lot of my clients information on this machine. Keys that let me log into their machines. Bitcoin Cash addresses and keys where I stored my fees.
Now someone had them. They could easily start stealing and spending my thousands in accumulated fees and harass my clients.
I’d lose a big chunk of my savings and my livelihood.
Immediately, I took over the computer and shut Lucas out while I created new crypto addresses and started transferring money. The fees from transferring would make me lose a little money, but it was better than losing it all.
I also started backing up the hard drive to several USB drives I had lying around. Just the important stuff like my files, personal photos, and client info.
When I let Lucas back in, he got to work finding the process that was exfiltrating my data and shutting it down. He tracked down the executable that was running the show and downloaded it to his own computer before deleting it from mine.
He promised to dissect it as best he could to figure out what it was doing.
Before he did that, however, he started monitoring my system to make sure the virus had been truly cleared out.
While watching my system, he gave me a task.
“Walk around your apartment. Search everywhere and look for that rogue device. It’s been continuously connected for days, which means whoever is doing this is probably not camped out on the road. From the name, I’d guess it’s a Raspberry Pi -- a small computer about the size of a phone but two inches tall.”
He sent me a picture of the type of device we were looking for.
“They probably left it hidden somewhere, either connected to an outlet or with a large battery pack. Go and look for it,” he insisted.
I got Jess to help me search the place top to bottom. Nothing. Not even outside in the bushes or on the back porch.
We split up and went to our neighbors, asking if they’d seen anyone suspicious hanging around the building in the last week. No one on our floor had. I went upstairs and asked the same questions.
Our upstairs neighbor said the only person he’d seen was a guy coming to update their satellite dish on the balcony. My throat seized up as I realized that could be them.
I asked hesitantly if I could look at their dish. I didn’t know them, but briefly explained that someone had left a device lying around that was breaking into our wifi and that our next step was to call the police.
They panicked at that, and let me check their balcony if I promised to keep them out of it if I called the cops. I agreed, knowing full well that they did drugs and would hate for the police to come around the apartment complex.
There, on the balcony, was exactly what Lucas had told me to look for. A black box sat along the wall between the satellite and the wall the cable ran into. A power cord exited the box and connected to an outlet on the balcony.
I cracked open the box with my fingers and found a circuit board inside, connected via usb to the outlet. The satellite cable passed straight through the box without connecting to anything. The box was a fake, made to look like it was doing something to the cable as it passed through.
The circuit board looked exactly like the picture Lucas had shown me.
There was our rogue device.
I unplugged the device, fully aware that unplugging it would alert whoever was controlling it. They could assume it was disconnected accidentally, or they would think I had found it. Either way, I couldn’t just leave it.
I thanked the neighbors and left with the whole box. Jess met me on the stairs, saying that Lucas had asked her to disconnect the internet on the computer and have me call him back.
Jess stared in wide-eyed shock as I showed her what I’d found. The upstairs neighbors were well within range of our wifi for the device to connect. The job was only barely sloppy enough to detect. We were lucky I had found it at all.
 
On the phone Lucas sounded panicked.
“They didn’t just copy your hard drive, they added files to it,” he squeaked. “Bad files. Bad pictures.”
My jaw tightened, and I felt sick. I made the connection to the client I’d dropped.
“Delete all your shit now,” Lucas was demanding. “You already backed up what you want, you need to destroy that hard drive. Smash it, burn it, bury it. Go get a new hard drive. Start as fresh as you can. I can help you get set back up if you want.”
“I think I know what’ll happen,” I muttered. “He’ll call the police on me and tip them off that I have those… pictures. They’ll find it and arrest me for possession. Game over.”
“He? You know who it is?” Lucas pressed.
I told him about the client I’d dropped.
“That’s why you need to torch your hard drives. Now. Both of you. Same with your phones. Who knows where else he’s been,” was Lucas’ advice.
I won’t confirm or deny what I did with the hard drive or the device. If I destroyed it, it would technically be destruction of evidence.
I ordered a new hard drive and reinstalled everything. I explained to my clients that I had lost internet connection for a couple of days, and didn’t end up losing any clients.
I haven’t told the police everything. The last time I got involved with them, there was so much harassment from them about my career that I’d rather not have more negative interactions with them. It just isn’t worth it in this case. I kept my report short and simple: a guy I met online and dumped might try something and come to my house. I gave them the information the client gave me, but I suspect more and more that it was fake.
Making a report will help if anything new happens.
I’ve written about this before on other anonymous forums, specifically for other Doms. Because of those posts, a few journalists have reached out and are writing features based on me, my career, and these events. They should be published in the next few days.
I’m just interested in sharing stories like this as publicly as possible, for awareness.
Lucas explained that the Raspberry Pi was a tiny computer that had a cellular connection so the client could connect to it from anywhere in the world and try to break into my wifi. Once he had succeeded, the client had gone to work breaking into my computer and getting their malware installed. We still don’t know 100% how he did it.
Lucas worked tirelessly to revise his software and remove vulnerabilities that could be used to trace me. We don’t know which vulnerabilities the client used, if any. We do know that there is one left, however.
I know this because every once in a while, a client will show up in my software who I didn’t sign up. A new name and data every time. I don’t dare click it. I just know what will be waiting for me upon connection.
“Like what you see?”
Lucas hasn’t been able to track down how he’s injecting fake clients into the software. Until Lucas can fix it, all I can do is click carefully and not connect again by accident. I’m sure the client is using a modified version of my spyware, ready to do all kinds of damage the moment I connect.
The guy is clearly an expert. Who knows how many other people he’s done something like this to. One thing is certain: he was prepared to conduct this attack.
My career isn’t always dangerous, but the clients can be unpredictable.
submitted by DigitDom to nosleep [link] [comments]

I earned about 4000% more btc with my android tablet than with a $250 ASIC mini rig setup using GekkoScience Newpac USB miners!

Requirements:
1.) Android Device with access to Google Play Store. *I haven't tried yet but you may be able to use tis on Android TV devces as well by sideloading. If anyone has success before I try, let me know! -Note, I did this with a Samsung Galaxy Tab S6 so its a newer more powerful device. If your android is older, your profts will most likely be less than what I earned but to give a projected range I also tested on my Raspberry Pi 4 running a custom LineageOS rom that doesn't allow the OS to make full use of the Pi's specs and I still got 500 h/s on that with Cloud boost, so about 60% of what my Tab 6 with MUCH Higher Specs does.
**Hey guys. Before I get started i just wanted to be clear about one thing. Yes I have seen those scammy posts sharing "miracle" boosts and fixes. I have a hard time believing stuff online anymore. But this is honestly real. Ill attach photos and explain the whole story and process below. Thanks for taking the time to read and feel free to share any thoughts, concerns, tips, etc*
So last week I finally got started with my first mini rig type mining build. I started getting into crypto about a year ago and it has taken me a long time to even grasp half of the projects out there but its been fun thus far! Anyways my rig was 2 GekkoScience Newpac USB miners, a Moonlander USB miner to pair with an FPGA i already had mining, a 10 port 60W 3.0 USB hub and 2 usb fans. The Newpacs actually are hashing at a combined 280 g/s which is actually better than their reported max hash rate when overclocked. Pleasant surpise and they are simple!! I just wanted to get a moonlander because my fpga already mines on Odocrypt for DGB and I just wanted to experience Scrypt mining and help build the DGB project. The Newpacs are mining BTC though.
After I got everything up and running i checked my payout daily average after 1 week. I averaged .01 a day TOTAL between all three miners with them all perforing ABOVE SPEC!!! I had done research so i knew I wouldnt earn much. More than anything i just wanted to learn. But still. I was kinda surprised in a negative way. Yesterday I actually earned less than .01 Frustrated I went back to scouring the web for new ideas. About a year ago, when II was starting, I saw an app on my iphone called CryptoBrowser that claimed to mine btc on your phone without actually using phone resources using a method of cloud mining. I tried it for a week and quit because I earned like .03 after a ton of use and seemed scammy. Plus my iphone actually would get very hot when doing this so I quit using it as it seemed like a possible scam with all the cryptonight browser mining hacks and malware out there.
Anyways I was on my Galaxy Tab S6 and saw that CryptoBrowser released a "PRO" edition for 3.99 on Google Play. I bought it for Sh*ts and giggles and booted it up. It came with what they called "Cloud Boost" Essentially this is a button you press and it multiplys the estimated hashrate that it gives you device by the number shown on the boost button. (With the purchase of PRO you get one free x10 boost. You can purchase additional boosts to use with other android devices but those are actually pretty pricy. Another x10 boost was like $25 if i remember correctly).
I played with it for about an hour to see if it actually worked like it said it would this time. To my surprise, as i was browsing, my device didnt increase in temperature AT ALL!!!!! I checked my tast manager to confirm and it was indeed true, my memory and usage barely went up. it was giving me an estimated range of 80-105 on the hashrate. Once i pushed the x10 boost button, that went to 800-1150 h/s. I switched my screen to not go to sleep, plugged it to the charge and let it run on the browser page, hashing. When you push the boost button, it runs for 3 hours at the boosted speeds. After that it goes back to normal but if you press the button again, it boosts everything again. There is no limit to how many times you use it. After checking what I earned after 24 hours, I HAD MADE .40 in BTC!!!!! I JUST EARNED OVER 4000% MORE THAN MY $280 MINING RIG EARNED ME!!!! I was blown away. Maybe this was a fluke? I did it again next day. Every 3 hours or so I would push the button again but thats all. Sure enough, .35 that day. Also, it realy BTC. I requested a payout and although it took like 12 hours for them to send me an email stating they had just sent it, I actually did recieve the state amount of BTC within 24 hours in my personal wallet. The fees to send are SUPER LOW!. Like .01
Below I will list the steps I took, along with an explanation of thier "Mining" process on Androids. Reminder, this ONLY WORKS ON ANDROIDS. Also DO NOT use cryptobrowser on a physcal laptop or desktop. I ran it on an old laptop for three days last year and it fried it. It does actually use your hardware on those platforms to mine and it is not efficnet at all as I suspect they prob steal over half of your power for themselves using the REAL RandomX protocol via browser mining which is EXTREMELY INEFFICIENT DONT TRY IT!!
-----How To Do This Yourself:
Cryptotab Browser states the program works on Android devices by estimating what it thinks the hashrate would be for your device specs and siimulates what you would mine in a remote server however you still earn that estimated coin amount. It is not a SHA-256 process or coin that they say is mining, rather it is XMR and they swap that and pay it out to you in BTC Bitcoin. However I know damn well my Tab S6 doesnt hash 80-105 h/s on RandomX because I have done it with a moodified XMRig module i ported to Android. I got 5 h/s a sec if I was getting any hashes at all. But thats besides the point as I still was making money.
Now, when you press that cloud boost button it immediately boosts that hash rate it estimates by the number on the cloud boost. As stated above, you can purchase more boosts and gift them or use them on extra android devices that you may have. Again, they are pricey so I'm not doing that plus it would just mean that I have another device that I have to leave on and open. The boosts come in x2, x4, x6, x8 and x10 variants. Again, they have unlimited uses.
Here is the link to grab yourself CryptoBrowser Pro from CryptoTab. This IS A REFERRAL LINK! This is where I benefit from doing tis tutorial. Like i said, I want to be transparent as this is not a scam but I'm also not doing this out of the love of my heart. Their referral system works in that people that use the donwload the app using your link are your stage 1 referrals. Anytime they are mining, you earn a 15% bonus. So say they mine $.30 one day. You would get paid out an additional $.045 in your own balance (it does not come out of the referred user balance fyi so no worries). Then lets say that referred miner also gets their own referrals. I would get a 10% bonus on whatever THOSE people mine. This goes on and on for like 8 tiers. Each tier the bonus percntage essential halves. So again, I stand to benefit from this but it also is stupid to not make this visible as its WAY CHEAPER, EASIER AND MORE PROFITABLE TO GET BTC USING THIS METHOD THAN IT IS USING ASICS!! THIS EARNS ALMOST AS MUCH BTC AS AN ANTMINER S7 DOES RUNNING 24/7 ONLY WITHOUT THE HUGE ELLECTRICTY BILL AND COSTS!!!!)
Thats it. Again, if you have concerns, let me know or if you have suggestions, other tips, etc... mention those as well!!!
https://cryptotabbrowser.com/8557319
Links to Picture Proof http://imgur.com/gallery/P13bEsB
submitted by Afraid_Balance to earnbitcoin [link] [comments]

/r/Bitcoin FAQ - Newcomers please read

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
Some great introductions for new users are My first bitcoin, Bitcoin explained and ELI5 Bitcoin. Also, the following videos are a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Also have to give mention to Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series. Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute. Bitcoin statistics can be found here, here and here. Developer resources can be found here, here and here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here. Potential upcoming protocol improvements here. Scaling resources here. The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!), and of course Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper that started it all! :)
Key properties of bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org, BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com and Howtobuybitcoin.io are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also, check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Bank Transfer Credit / Debit card Cash
Gemini Bitstamp LocalBitcoins
Bitstamp Bitit Mycelium LocalTrader
BitFinex Cex.io LibertyX
Cex.io CoinMama WallofCoins
Xapo Spectrocoin BitcoinOTC
Kraken Luno BitQuick
itBit
HitBTC
Bitit
Bisq (decentralized)
Luno
Spectrocoin
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Android iOs Desktop
Samouari BreadWallet Electrum
Another interesting use case for physical storage/transfer is the Opendime. Opendime is a small USB stick that allows you to spend Bitcoin by physically passing it along so it's anonymous and tangible like cash.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account, usually from a text message or app, making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy
Android Android
iOS iOS

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for some good options, some of the more commons ones are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Steam, HumbleBundle, Games Planet, itch.io, g2g and kinguin For when you need to get your game on
Microsoft Xbox games, phone apps and software
Spendabit, Overstock, The Bitcoin Directory and BazaarBay Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Hyphen.to, Coinsfer, More #1, #2 Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway, Thuisbezorgd NL, Pizza For Coins Takeout delivered to your door!
Expedia, Cheapair, Lot, Destinia, BTCTrip, Abitsky, SkyTours, Fluege the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
BitHost VPS service
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun For new domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Reddit Gold Premium membership which can be gifted to others
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations, such as Wikipedia, United Way, ACLU and the EFF. You can find a longer list here.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. Bitseed is an easy option for getting set up. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, XBTfreelancer, Cryptogrind, Bitlancerr, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, Rein Project Freelancing
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
Streamium.io, XOtika.tv NSFW, /GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Video Streaming
Bitasker, BitforTip Tasks
Supload.com, SatoshiBox, JoyStream, File Army File/Image Sharing
CoinAd, A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins)

Bitcoin Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network, Amiko Pay, and Strawpay Payment channels for network scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
21, Inc. Open source library for the machine payable web
ShapeShift.io Trade between bitcoins and altcoins easily
Open Transactions, Counterparty, Omni, Open Assets, Symbiont and Chain Financial asset platforms
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Mediachain Decentralized media library
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
Samourai and Dark Wallet - abandoned Privacy-enhancing wallets
JoinMarket CoinJoin implementation (Increase privacy and/or Earn interest on bitcoin holdings)
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase and Bitrated Identity & Reputation management
Telehash Mesh networking
JoyStream BitTorrent client with paid seeding
MORPHiS Decentralized, encrypted internet
Storj and Sia Decentralized file storage
Streamium Pay in real time for on-demand services
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
bitSIM PIN secure hardware token between SIM & Phone
Identifi Decentralized address book w/ ratings system
BitGo Multisig bitcoin API
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library
Insight Open source blockchain API
Leet Kill your friends and take their money ;)

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin SI unit for milli i.e. millilitre (mL) or millimetre (mm)
microbitcoin μBTC 1,000,000 per bitcoin SI unit for micro i.e microlitre (μL) or micrometre (μm)
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin Colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin Smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit. A complete list of bitcoin related subreddits can be found here
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BinaryResult to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A slightly overboard response to my threat model.

For what I hope are obvious reasons, I don't want, and probably will never post my threat model publicly online. However, regardless of that, what I'm sure you will extrapolate from this post is that I live my life, digitally in particular, with a fairly high level threat model. This is not because I'm some super sophisticated criminal mastermind, but rather, I am at this level because I genuinely love playing around with this stuff. And I just happen to understand the importance of privacy and just how vital it is to a truly healthy society. I would like to extend a thanks to ProgressiveArchitect for the sharing of the knowledge they have done on this subreddit, /privacytoolsio, and the like. We may have never interacted, but nevertheless, your input into this community is truly interesting and extremely informative and educating. I'm sure those of you familiar with PA's setup will be able to draw some parallels with mine and their's.
Thank you.
I hope you all enjoy reading this write up.
I run Qubes OS on a Lenovo ThinkPad X230 laptop. Specs for it are as following: - i7-3520M - 16GB RAM - 1TB Samsung 860 Evo SSD - Qualcomm Atheros AR9285 wireless card
Additionally, I used a Raspberry Pi Model 3B+ and a Pomono SPI clip to replace the stock BIOS firmware with coreboot+me_cleaner. This wasn't done out of any "real" concern for the Intel ME (though of course proprietary black-boxes like it should be avoided at all costs and not trusted), but rather for open source enthusiasm and for increased security and faster boot times than what the stock BIOS firmware allows for. On that note about the ME, I don't believe the conspiracy theories that claim that it is a state-sponsored attack method for surveillance. I believe that Intel had good intentions for improving the lives of IT professionals who need to manage hundreds, if not thousands of remote machines. However, it has proven time and time again to be insecure, and I don't need the remote management and the "features" that it provides on my machines.
In Qubes, I use a combination of AppVMs and StandaloneVMs for a variety of different purposes. All VMs use PVH over HVM, except for the Mirage Unikernel Firewall, which uses PV, and the sys-net and sys-usb StandaloneVMs which have to use HVM because of PCI device passthrough. Right now most of my VMs are AppVMs, but for maintenance and compartmentalization reasons, I am considering moving more towards StandaloneVMs, despite the increase in disk space and bandwidth usage for updates.
General route of from Qubes to the Internet for anonymous browsing, general private browsing, accessing Uni services, and Uni-related anonymous browsing respectively: 1. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->sys-vpn-wg->sys-corridor->sys-whonix->whonix-ws-15-dvm to the internet. 2. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->sys-vpn-wg to the Internet. 3. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->uni-vpn-wg to the Internet. 4. Qubes->sys-mirage-firewall->uni-vpn-wg->uni-corridor->uni-whonix->uni-anon-research to the Internet.

(Note: the VPN name is substituted in the "vpn" above. I had to remove it to comply with this subreddit's rules. It is easy to identify what VPN it is as it randomly generates a long numaric string and has fantastic support for WireGuard.)

Web Browsers: - Tor Browser (primary) in a disposable Whonix VM. - Firefox (secondary) with the about:config changes listed on privacytools.io and the following extensions: Cookies AutoDelete, Decentraleyes, HTTPS Everywhere, uBlock Origin (advance user, all third party content blocked and JavaScript disabled), and Vim Vixen. Used in my personal AppVM. - Ungoogled Chromium (Uni only) with standard uBlock Origin and cVim. Used only for Uni-related access in my uni-campus and uni-home AppVMs.
Search Engine: SearX, Startpage, and DuckDuckGo.
Password Manager: KeePassXC.
Office: LibreOffice.
Notes: Standard Notes.
Messaging: Signal Desktop.
Media Playback: mpv.
Emails: I access my personal email within my personal Qubes domain and my Uni email using my Uni Qubes domains. My emails are downloaded to a local repository using isync, send using msmtp, and read using neomutt with html emails converted to plain text using w3m. Emails are sent in plain text too. All of the attachments in the emails (PDFs mostly) are automatically opened in DisposableVMs.
My personal Posteo email account has incoming encryption setup. This means that I emailed my public GPG key to an address correlated to my actual Posteo email address so that all email that I receive is encrypted with my public key and can only be decrypted using my private key. So even if my emails were intercepted and/or my account broken into, the contents of them are safe since they are encrypted as soon as they hit Posteo's servers.
I have setup a number of Posteo aliases that are completely segregated from the email I used to register my account. One of those is considered my "professional" email for my current job. I have another couple aliases, one dedicated for 33mail and another dedicated for Abine Blur. I make use of 33mail alias addresses for catch-all email addresses for registering for accounts that need to be under a username associated with my name anyways. This is for purposes like putting different compartmentalized, but still related emails to put onto my Resume. I use a different alias for each Resume I put out online. That way, when that information gets sold, traded, etc., I can easily trace it back to who sold the information. For example, if I applied for a job online that required me to go through the process of registering an account through a third-party, say 'xyz Inc', the address I would register that account with would be [email protected], or something along those lines. Abine Blur is used much in the same manner but for accounts that don't need to be associated with my real name in any way, say online shopping on Amazon that I do under an many aliases, then ship to various address that I don't live at, but that I can visit with no problems. I use a different Blur address with each service like with 33mail for the same reasoning shown above.
The passwords for the accounts are encrypted and stored locally in each of the domains, however, my private key is stored in my vault domain, so even if an adversary were to compromise the domains, they wouldn't be able to steal my private key without exploiting the hypervisor. They would only be able to wait for me to authorize the usage of my private key in that domain, and even then, it could only be used to decrypt files. That is a concern that they can use my private key to decrypt messages, but they wouldn't be able to steal the key. With my personal email, the emails would also be encrypted locally anyway so they wouldn't be able to read them. My Uni email, in contrast, uses Outlook unfortunately, so there isn't any option to enable incoming encryption, and even if it was, I'm not sure how private it would be anyways.
For those looking for an in depth list of all my VMs, with explanations for the more obscure ones, I have listed them below. I have got a lot of templates, hence why I am considering moving over to StandaloneVMs, but as of right now:

Templates:

StandaloneVMs:

AppVMs:

Phone: Motorola Moto G5s running Lineage OS 16.0 Pie no G-Apps or micro-G with the following Apps: - AdAway: Open Source hosts file-based ad blocker. (Requires root.) - AFWall+: Linux iptables front end. (Requires root.) - Amaze: File manager. - andOPT: 2FA app. I like it since it can export the entries to an AES encrypted file. - AntennaPod: Podcast manager. - AnySoftKeyboard - Simple Calendar - Simple Contacts Pro - DAVx5: CalDav syncronization with my calendar on my Posteo email account. - F-Droid - Fennec F-Droid: Web Browser. Has the same Firefox addons like on Qubes minus Vim Vixen. I used the app Privacy Settings to configure the about:config. - KeePassDX: Password manager. - KISS launcher - Magisk Manager - NewPipe: YouTube app replacement. - S.Notes: Standard Notes. - OsmAnd~: Maps and navigation. - Red Moon: Blue light filter. - SELinuxModeChanger: Exactly as it sounds. (Requires root.) - Shelter: Work profile manager. - Signal: Messaging. - Vinyl Music Player: Music player. - WireGuard: VPN protocol frontend. Is configured to use my VPN account. Is setup as an always-on and connected VPN.
As mentioned, I use Shelter to manage my work profile. In it I isolate the following apps: - Clover: *chan browser. - Orbot: For routing apps through Tor. Is setup as an always-on and connected VPN. - RedReader: Reddit client. - Tor Browser
Over the last several years, I have started using my phone less and less and taking advantage of less of what it has got to offer. I don't check email on my device. I have no real need to browse the Internet on it outside of watching videos using NewPipe, browsing Reddit, and various *chan boards.
On the Smart Phone side of things, I am considering purchasing an older used iPhone SE or 6S for use with MySudo when outside of my home as well as an iPod Touch for use on WiFi only for use inside my home. The iPhone would be kept inside of a faraday bag when I am at home and not using it. It would also be kept in the faraday bag whenever at home to avoid associating that device with my home address. The iPod Touch would be used for MySudo calls instead.
Future outlook and plan for my privacy and security:
To avoid as much deanonymisation of my privacy as possible, I'm only going to specify enough so that anyone reading this can get the jist of my situation in life. I am quite young (age 16 to 25) and I started along this privacy journey when I was even younger. I was never a very heavy social media user, however I did have an online presence if you looked hard enough. My name fortunately is a very common and short name, so that does help to bury information that I was not able to remove further in the vast trenches that is the Internet.
On the digital side of things, I mentioned that I have a dedicated Crypto AppVM for handling crypto currency transactions using Bisq. I have setup a dedicated bank account that I have periodically been transferring money into so that I can trade crypto. Unfortunately, I do not live in the US, so being able to effectively start trades with others is more difficult. I also do not have access to a credit card masking account like privacy.com (that I absolutely would use given the ability). I plan on getting an anonymous VPS to host my own Tor exit node for better speeds and to mitigate the possibility of malicious exit nodes. The country I live in has been a proponent of absolute dragnet surveillance on all activities occurring online and in real life, though the former is far more visible on this subreddit. I will be using crypto with cleaned Bitcoin (as seen with ProgressiveArchitect's setup) for purchasing my VPN service, etc.
With future hardware, to replace my aging laptop, I am very hopeful for Xen, then eventually Qubes OS getting ported to Power9. When that happens I'll be getting a Raptor Computing Blackbird as a desktop. Maybe in the future I'll get a Purism Librem laptop, but for now my corebooted X230 works perfectly for my use cases. On that note, I have successfully build the Heads firmware for the X230 and I was able to get the minimal 4MB image flashed on my laptop. I did revert it back to my coreboot setup after playing around a little with it, and unfortunately I haven't had time since to do a full, complete flash of it.
On the physical/real life side of things, I plan on making use of various Trusts in order to hold assets, say to keep my name from being immediately visible on the title of my car. As of right now I am fortunate enough to have the title of my car under the name of someone who I trust. Unless I am legally required, and where there are immediate and absolute consequences, I use fake names in real life. With Uni, I am enrolled under my real name and address. This is a requirement and it is verified, so there is nothing that I can realistically do about it. As for other services, I plan on setting up a personal mailbox (PMB), etc if possible to use as a real, physical address that is associated with my real name and that is used for things like Government issued ID. In the future when I move again, I plan on renting a place in cash to try and keep my name dissociated with my real address. For those looking for reasoning on why one would want to do that, please read How to be Invisible by J.J. Luna. It's truly the Bible of physical privacy.
At this stage I am just going off on a ramble, so I should cut it short here.
I have just started and I live for this shit.
submitted by ComprehensiveAddict to privacy [link] [comments]

(Updated) [Staking] Reddcoin Core client GUI wallet on a Raspberry Pi Model 3B

Intro

This thread is an update to my first Reddcoin staking tutorial that was written 7 months ago.
 
The reason for the update
My Reddcoin Core software crashed and became unusable. My Raspberry Pi 3B would lag and freeze, I couldn't stake anymore.
 
Instead of just redoing everything the same way, I wanted to see if I could improve on 3 points:
 
The updates
 
If you would like to tip me
Writing a tutorial like this takes time and effort; tips are appreciated. My Reddcoin address: RqvdnNX5MTam855Y2Vudv7yVgtXdcYaQAW.
     

Overview

 

Steps

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     

Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Snr5e8bzftI
This video shows how long it takes to start Reddcoin Core.   TL;DR:
     

Extra

Backup
Backup your wallet to prevent losing the RDDs in your wallet! There are two methods to backup, do both. Make new backups if you create a new receiving address!
 
 
   
Boot with only 1 USB drive plugged in:
Make sure only the USB drive (with the swap partition and data partition) is plugged in when you boot up your Raspberry Pi. This to make sure the swap partition (/dev/sda1) is recognized correctly.   If you boot up with multiple USB drives, Lubuntu might see the USB drive with the swap partition as the second drive (instead of the first drive), and ignore the 2 GB swap partition. If this happens, starting Reddcoin can render the Raspberry Pi unresponsive.
   
Connection issues If you have issues syncing the blockchain because you have 0 network connections, please follow the instructions in this thread.
   
Start Reddcoin Core easier
Run a shell script (.sh file), so you can start Reddcoin just by double clicking on an icon on your Desktop.
   
Minimization options
Adjust minimization options, so you can safely press on the X button (the close/exit button on the upper right corner).
   
RealVNC VNC Viewer (client) and VNC Connect (server): To remote connect to the Raspberry Pi, I use VNC Viewer ad VNC Connect from RealVNC.
 
   
Chromium as browser: The updates break Firefox, the browser crashes when you try to run it. Install another browser, Chromium, to solve this issue.
   
Updates / Upgrades
If Software Updater shows up and tells you that there is updated software available, do not install the updates using Software Updater. Use LXTerminal to update Lubuntu.  
     

Credits:

   
Credits in previous tutorial:
submitted by Yavuz_Selim to reddCoin [link] [comments]

Monero mining, the road to hell.

You know it started out innocent enough. One friend at work started talking innocently about Monero and before I knew it I had hooked the work PC up to Minergate and had started mining. After I day I saw Moneros slowly ticking in and felt that it needed to go faster, so I downloaded the client as well on my gaming PC at home, but I wasn't able to use the graphic card, the Moneros were still ticking in at a too slow rate.
I did some more reading and found out that Minergate was the devil, that the way to go about this was to set up my own wallet and mine using a client, directly toward a pool. First I created a web-wallet, but then I remember MtGox and all the trouble with bitcoins being lost, so I created a shell wallet on my file server at home and downloaded a few clients, compiled, compared, tuned and after a while I started to see some real Monero dripping in. I managed to get the NVidia miner up on my gaming rig with the juicy 980Ti card and that really made the difference, but I wanted more.
I work with grid solutions/high performance computing and at work we have a lab where I can basically set up whatever equipment that I want (within reason) and latch on to work's power grid. I decided to set up a dual GPU system and just leave it running in the lab area where we have the consoles and do general close proximity work to make things work in the real lab. I did not have a casing so I ordered everything I needed and after some troubleshooting (BIOS did not support the Kaby Lake CPU) I got things up and running on 2xRX480 cards, nicely hashing in on about 630H/s on each card.
In the mean time, to maximize my Monero flow I had turned every device, work and private into CPU and GPU miners, every clock tick squeezed for maximum utilization and at one point I even ran clients on useless Raspberry PIs, slow file servers and Beagle Bone Internet of Things cards, yielding no more than 3-6 H/s. It all added up, but I still needed more.
I started looking into building a real mining rig. I ordered an AMD Motherboard, more PSUs, CPU, RAM, USB risers, etc. and I got a rig frame flown in from China at a reasonable price. In the meantime I had already ordered another RX480 which were idling on my work desk while I was building the rig. The rig was being set up at my work desk, sitting next to my work PC which also was mining Monero at full capacity when I wasn't at work. GPU mining needs to be off if the system is to be used without severe graphics lag.
I had installed 2 GPU clients on my home system as well, one that really bogged down the system, rendering it unusable for anything except mining, the other setting I could easily do other work, web-browsing and such without too much lag from the graphic cards. Whenever I left for work or went to sleep I put the heavy load version on, and when I got home from work or woke up in the morning, my living room was warm and cozy, at least 4-5'C above the usual.
By now I had gathered 5 GPUs which had completely filled up my mining rig. Achievement unlocked! Although I still had some debugging work to do on it (random crashes) it still would run smoothly most of the time. The Monero is pouring in, about $10 USD worth of Monero each day, from both my rig and the myriad of fileservers, gaming and work PCs, and stupid little devices that were designed for completely different things. The value of Monero had increased from about $12 USD to $30 USD during this time, everything was with a promising outlook.
Then, yesterday it occurred to me, I did move 2 cards from the first PC that I bought, to the mining rig, which means that I could get two new cards and put into that one. So, I have just ordered myself two more RX480 (which by the way are much nicer for Monero mining than the RX580s) and as I am sitting here, having just ordered those cards, I am already planning the next step, moving the first motherboard out of the PC and latch it on to a rig and connect 2 more cards (it's a mATX motherboard with 4 PCI-e slots)
But now, I am wondering, where will this all end? Have I become a Monero mining addict? How many rigs and graphic cards do I need to finally feel satisfied? When do I get enough? And will this short term bankrupt me completely? Well, at least I am not using money on booze, drugs or hookers, but it still feels like an addiction.
Any words of advice or comfort appreciated...
submitted by bloodwire to MoneroMining [link] [comments]

QTUM Staking Guide

Is there a place besides Reddit for me or others to contribute to a staking guide?
Table of Contents:
Cold Storage
Without staking, you can still store QTUM private keys offline. (I'm assuming some of this from my experience with Bitcoin and Ethereum. Some of the following statements could be inaccurate)
submitted by RayMetz100 to Qtum [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

Zeus/Gaw ASIC Setup Guide for Linux/Raspberry Pi

So I recently I became quite interested in mining and cyptocurrencies in general. So interested in fact that I bit the bullet and decided to buy myself a GAW Fury.
I then spent some time doing research on how to set up a GAW or Zeus ASIC on Linux, in particular on a Raspberry Pi, and have found most guides to be awful. The reason they are so bad IMHO is that they assume quite a bit of prior knowledge, either with Linux or mining, and give very little instructions. So I have tried to put together a guide that requires very little prior knowledge.
It is my aim that anyone could get their shiny new asic up and mining in no time using this guide. Anyway, I present...

The Complete Noobs Guide to Setting Up a Zeus or Gaw ASIC on Debian/Ubuntu/Raspberry Pi

Resources

About Cyrptocurrencies and Their Jargon

If you are new to cryptocurrencies and how they work I suggest taking a look at this series of KhanAcademy videos. They are for Bitcoin but the theory is the same. I found them very helpful when it came to understanding what mining actually does and the mechanics of cyrptocurrencies.
Also take a look at sircamm22 his info found here, is great and breaks down a large number of concepts. I slightly disagree with no. 21 regarding preordering. Just exercise common sense.

Linux

If you are new to Linux you could follow along by simply typing in the commands. However I highly recommend taking the time to learn what you are doing. This course is a great place to start.

Computer Setup

By the end of this section you will have your device turned on, fully setup and connected to the internet with.
Note: Commands to be typed into the command line will be displayed like this:
echo Hello World

Desktop/Laptop

For laptops and desktops already running Ubuntu or Debian I will assume you have setup your internet setup as part of the installation.
If not: There are plenty of guides out there and the installation/setup process is very easy. A good place to start for Ubuntu is here.
Now open up a terminal window. Ctrl + alt + t on a standard Ubuntu installation.
If you plan on using this PC without a monitor I would suggest installing an SSH Server.
These commands will be discussed later on in the guide.
sudo apt-get -y install openssh-server
sudo service openssh-server start

Raspberry Pi

The Raspberry Pi Foundation has put together a great guide in PDF format.
Use NOOBS it will save you a lot of trouble. NB: Some SD cards don't support NOOBs but will work fine if the image is put on using a different method.
Here is a great guide for setting up the Raspberry Pi SD card from Elinux.org. In fact it's a great place to start for anything RPi related. Raspberry Pi hub at Elinux.
Once the SD card is setup you will need to insert it into the Raspberry Pi and boot. Install Raspbian from the NOOBs menu and wait.
Follow this guide by Adafruit for first time setup. You will need to enable SSH Server.
I suggest not starting the desktop on boot. It can be easily run from the command line by typing startx.
Follow this guide by Adafruit to setup your network. Found here. No need to do this if you set up previously in the first time config.
We will also at this point want to setup ssh. Again I will point you to an Adafruit guide.
Once done exit back to a standard command line interface. This can be done in LXDE by using the power off menu located in the bottom right corner.

Miner Setup

Installing BFGMiner

If you want to the Raspberry Pi or PC without a monitor go ahead and SSH into your device.
So now you should be staring at a command line interface whether on the device with a monitor or via SSH.
First things first lets make sure we are all up to date. This will update our package list from the repositories and upgrade them to the newest version. "-y" Will simply say yes to any prompts.
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get -y upgrade
We are going to need to install some useful tools. Git-core is how we will clone and download BFGMiner from GitHub and Screen allows multiple command line instances and means if we exit out of ssh session or quit Terminal on Ubuntu, BFGMiner will continue to run.
sudo apt-get install git-core screen
We also need to download some other tools/dependencies to ensure that BFGMiner will compile successfully.
sudo apt-get -y install build-essential autoconf automake libtool pkg-config libcurl4-gnutls-dev libjansson-dev uthash-dev libncursesw5-dev libudev-dev libusb-1.0-0-dev libevent-dev libmicrohttpd-dev libc-bin
Ok now change into your home directory.
cd ~
And clone BFGMiner by Darkwinde.
git clone https://github.com/Darkwinde/bfgminer.git
Once the download has completed move into the bfgminer directory.
cd bfgminer
The following steps may take a while.
Now run autogen.sh
sudo ./autogen.sh
You will need to make the configure script execuitable.
sudo chmod +x ./configure
Now configure bfgminer
sudo ./configure CFLAGS="-O3" --enable-scrypt
Now lets make!
sudo make
Install BFGMiner
sudo make install
One more thing...
sudo ldconfig

Running BFGMiner

If you haven't already plug in your ASIC.
Just confirm your system is recognising the ASIC.
lsusb
Its output should look similar to this (no need to type this in):
Bus 001 Device 005: ID 10c4:ea60 Cygnal Integrated Products, Inc. CP210x UART Bridge / myAVR mySmartUSB light
Yep there it is our ASIC listed as device 005. There is no need to install any drivers, unlike in windows, as they come in the kernel.
Now lets actually start BFGMiner.
You will want to start a screen session to ensure BFGMiner doesn't quite when you exit.
"-S" is the option for starting a new screen session. You can replace "miner" with anything you like.
screen -S miner
Now you can run the commands below.
Here is a sample of what you should type. You will need to replace somethings with your own values.
sudo bfgminer --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://URL:PORT -u USERNAME -p PASSWORD --zeus-cc CHIPCOUNT --zeus-clk 328 -S zeus:/dev/ttyUSB0
Where:
URL:PORT is the address and port of the pool you wih to use. Now I won't suggest a pool. I will leave that decision up to you. If you do wish to mine DOGE take a look at this site for a list of pools and comparisons.
USERNAME this is the username you use on the pool. Every pool is different. Check your pool's website for details. PASSWORD same as above. Specific to your pool, not every pool requires one.
CHIPCOUNT this is specific to which ASIC you are using.
For GAWMiner ASIC's:
  • War Machine: 256
  • Falcon: 128
  • Black Widow: 64
  • Fury: 6
For ZeusMiner ASIC's:
  • Blizzard: 6
  • Cyclone: 96
  • Hurricane X2: 48
  • Hurricane X3: 64
  • Thunder X2: 96
  • Thunder X3: 128
Now to make sure you don't stop mining when you exit ssh or terminal. Press:
ctrl + a + d
To come back to the BFGMiner screen simply run:
screen -r miner
You're done!!

Start on Boot

First off you will want to make sure you have BFGMiner running correctly. Ensure you have the miners set up properly and your pool correctly configured.
Start a BFGMiner instance, detailed above.
Once the instance has started and you are happy with how everything is working press "s" on your keyboard to enter the settings menu.
Now press the "w" key. Don't press enter. We want to specify where our config will go. Type:
/home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Substitute USERNAME for your user. On a standard RPI install its pi. On ubuntu it's what you set during the instillation.
Now press the enter key to return back to the main BFGMiner screen. Press "q" on your keyboard to exit BFGMiner. You should now be back in the command line.
Now we want to edit a file called rc.local. Any commands in this file will be executed on boot.
sudo nano /etc/rc.local
Depending on your system this file may already contain some commands. Be careful not to delete them.
After the last command and before "exit 0" type the following on one line:
sudo -u USERNAME screen -d -m sudo bfgminer --config /home/USERNAME/bfgminer.conf
Where USERNAME = your username
Hit ctrl + x then y to save and exit nano.
The above command will create a new screen session and run bfgminer using the config we created earlier. All while as our username so that we can easily reattach.
Lets reboot to ensure it is working correctly:
sudo reboot
Once rebooted and logged in, show all running screen sessions:
screen -ls
Reattach to the session. You only need to use the numbers before the first dot.
e.g Mine looks like: 2480..hostname (13/07/14 12:02:09) (Detached). So I type:
screen -r 2480
Verify everything worked as expected. Then ctrl + a + d to exit.
You have now setup BFGMiner to restart on reboot.

Power Failure

If you are using a Raspberry Pi and it loses power it will automatically reboot on receiving power again.
For standard desktop PCs there is an option in some BIOS/UEFI to turn the computer on when it receives power. Consult your motherboard's manual and manufacturer's website.

Sources

Here is where I got my info from.
And of course /dogemining

Wrap Up

Congrats you've done it. You have managed to successfully get your shiny new asic mining away.
I do plan to make another guide detailing how to setup and use StarMiner a ready to go RPi mining distro.
So I hope this is helpful for you guys. I have seen lots of posts asking the exact same questions again and again and I have tried to answer these as best I can. I am still learning about this stuff so if there is something I have missed or a mistake I have made please tell me.
Anyway good luck. And I'll see you at the moon.
Cheers Frogsiedoodle
Edit 1: Layout and formatting.
Edit 2: Added instructions for screen which I initially forgot.
Edit 3: Removed 1 unneeded dependency
Edit 4: Added section on start on reboot and power failure.
submitted by Frogsiedoodle to dogemining [link] [comments]

Raspberry Pi + ASIC defcoin mining guide

Want to get started mining defcoin with an ASIC and a Raspberry Pi? Does 360 KH/s of mining power sound appealing? Here’s how to do it.
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Blpj8IvCcAEIStY.jpg
1) Hardware List
-Raspberry Pi Model B
--SD Card
--Micro USB power supply
--Ethernet cable
-Gridseed ASIC
--12V power supply (5.5mm/2.5mm barrel connector)
--USB to Mini USB data cable
The main component is the Gridseed ASIC, which will be doing the Scrypt calculations. The Raspberry Pi will be used as the controller for the ASIC, and will be doing the communication with the mining pool. If you’re not familiar with the term, an ASIC is an Application-Specific Integrated Circuit - basically a chip with a single purpose, like mining crypto currency. Using an ASIC will allow us to mine more efficiently than we would be able to with general purpose hardware.
The ASIC that I’m using is a “300+ KH/s Single Gridseed ASIC Miner”. It looks like a CPU heatsink with a fan attached. There is actually a circuit board with 5 ASIC chips sandwiched between two halves of this heatsink, and has a mini USB connector and a power connector sticking out the side. There are a few places where you can buy these. I bought mine at GAWMiners.com for $130. That was the lowest price that I could find, and I had a good experience buying from them. Use this link, and you can get $20 off of a $200 order (and give me some referral points :-)) GAWMiners. You can also find other vendors by searching for “Gridseed ASIC”. You’ll need a 12V power supply to power the ASIC, and a USB A to USB Mini B cable to connect the ASIC to the Raspberry Pi. I’m using a 60W power supply, which seems to be working fine for defcoin (Scrypt) mining. These ASICs can also mine Bitcoin at the same time, but you may need a beefier power supply if you want to do that.
The Raspberry Pi can be purchased at any number of places- Amazon, SparkFun, AdaFruit, etc. I’m using the Model B because I had one already, and also because it has a built in ethernet port that will make connecting to the internet easy. Make sure to get an SD Card and a micro USB power adapter to get the Pi up and running too.
2) Software
If you haven’t already, download the defcoin wallet from defcoin.org. If you want to do pooled mining, create an account for one of the defcoin pools, such as redbaron.us or whichever other pool you want to mine. Once you’ve created a pool account, make sure to create a worker too (for MPOS pools, that will be under My Account > My Workers). The password for your worker does not have to be the same as the password for your pool account (and it probably shouldn’t be).
Next, download the latest Raspbian image from raspberrypi.org/downloads/ and install the image to your SD card. Instructions for installing the image can be found here. If you are using the dd method on a Mac, make sure to use /dev/rdiskX instead of /dev/diskX - both will work, but rdiskX is much faster. Once you have the image installed, put the SD card in the Raspberry Pi, connect the Pi to your network, and connect the Pi to your micro USB power adapter to power it on. Next, SSH in to your Raspberry Pi with the default username and password pi/raspberry. I use nMap to find the IP address that has been assigned to my Pi. You can also use an HDMI display and a USB keyboard to log in instead of using SSH. After logging in for the first time, run through the wizard that comes up to configure your Raspberry Pi. The defaults are fine for most things, just make sure that you don’t skip the step to expand the filesystem to use the rest of your SD card. If you don’t expand the filesystem, there won’t be enough space for other software.
Once you have Raspbian installed, and have gotten through all of the first login setup stuff (which will likely end with a reboot), log back in to the Raspberry Pi with the pi user. From the command line, run sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
There are some stability issues with USB communication between the Raspberry Pi and the Gridseed ASIC. Enabling SLUB debugging seems to resolve this, at least well enough to prevent the Raspberry Pi from freezing every so often. Open the /boot/cmdline.txt file, and add the following text to the end of the line. Don’t add a new line, just add this to the end. You can use vi, nano, or whatever your favorite text editor is to do this.
slub_debug=FP 
Reboot the Raspberry Pi once you’ve added that flag to your /boot/cmdline.txt file.
sudo shutdown -r now 
Log back in with the pi user once the Raspberry Pi is finished rebooting.
The mining software that we’re going to use is a customized version of cgminer that has support for the Gridseed GC3355 chips that are used in our ASIC. There are a number of different mining programs out there, this is just what has been working the best for me so far. First, install git and dependencies needed to compile cgminer.
sudo apt-get install git build-essential libtool libcurl4-openssl-dev libncurses5-dev libudev-dev autoconf automake 
Next, clone the git repository for cgminer-gc3355
git clone https://github.com/dtbartle/cgminer-gc3355.git 
Next, we’ll build cgminer.
cd cgminer-gc3355 autoreconf -i ./configure --enable-scrypt --enable-gridseed make 
Once the make command finishes, we’re ready to run the mining software. You can also run make install if you want to install the software, but running it out of the build directory works just fine. Plug in the power supply for your ASIC, and connect the ASIC to it. Connect the USB cable to the ASIC and to your Raspberry Pi. Run the mining software by running the following command. The -o option specifies your pool URL, the -u option specifies your username and the workername that you set up for the pool, and the -p option is the password for your worker. There are a couple of options available that are specific to the gridseed ASICs, and those will be placed after --gridseed-options. The freq=850 option sets the clock frequency of the ASIC to 850 MHz. There are other clock options available, but 850 seems to be working best for me. I was getting hardware errors at 900, and a lower average hash rate. I am getting about 360 KH/s with the clock frequency set to 850.
sudo ./cgminer -o stratum+tcp://www.redbaron.us:3333 -u Username.Workername -p yourworkerpassword --gridseed-options freq=850 
This command needs to be run with sudo in order to access the USB hardware. You can also create another user specifically for mining, or grant the pi user the appropriate permissions if you don’t want to run cgminer as root. When you run this command, you should see output from cgminer showing that it is communicating with the mining pool, and something showing your hash rate. If you’ve gotten this far, and you’re seeing output from cgminer showing a hash rate, congratulations, you’re mining defcoins with your ASIC! There are just a couple more steps to do if you want to let your Raspberry Pi and ASIC continue mining without needing you to be logged in.
To keep cgminer running after I log out, I am using nohup. You could also use screen instead of nohup. Create a script (startMiner.sh) by running the following commands.
echo “nohup /home/pi/cgminer-gc3355/cgminer --real-quiet -o stratum+tcp://www.redbaron.us:3333 -u Username.Workername -p yourworkerpassword --gridseed-options freq=850 &” > /home/pi/startMiner.sh chmod a+x /home/pi/startMiner.sh 
If you run this command with sudo startMiner.sh, cgminer will run in the background, and will continue running after you log out. If you want to have this run when your Raspberry Pi boots, modify your /etc/rc.local script so that it executes this startMiner.sh script. Your /etc/rc.local file will end up looking like this:
# Print the IP address _IP=$(hostname -I) || true if [ "$_IP" ]; then printf "My IP address is %s\n" "$_IP" fi /home/pi/startMiner.sh exit 0 
That’s it! You should now have a Raspberry Pi controlling a defcoin mining ASIC, that starts mining as soon as it boots up. For more reading, check out some of the links below.
Gridseed GC3355 5 Chip Setup writeup on bitcointalk
cgminer-gc3355
Crypto Mining Blog
GAWMiners
raspberrypi.org
There are also some pre-built images for using a Raspberry Pi as an ASIC mining controller. I haven’t tried any of these myself, but they could be worth checking out. Raspberry Pi Controller Images with Gridseed ASIC Support
submitted by _RedBaron_ to defcoin [link] [comments]

[SG] 3x GAW Fury 1.4mh miners REDUCED

I am looking to sell three GAW Miner's 1.4mhs Fury ASICs. All three have been running for the past two months without any issues. I have not overclocked or undervolted or whatever (not smart enough). Mining on PandaPool has been giving me ~200 DGC every 4 hours. PIC In the sale I will include TWO usb micro cables, and THREE power supplies. You will need to provide a usb micro cable. I'm not selling the raspberry pi or usb hub in the picture. I'd like to get $75USD equivalent in Dogecoin or Bitcoin. Shipping from zipcode 83709.
submitted by sawtoothm to dogemarket [link] [comments]

Mining on a RaspberryPi

I'm new to Bitcoin Mining and I'm thinking of using a RasberryPi to get myself started. I've done a little bit of research and seen some USB ASICs, but I was wondering if I could run it on a RasberryPi alone.
I know this probably isn't an ideal way of doing it, and at the moment I'm only looking at it as something to keep me busy on my days off.
The reason I've chosen to use a RaspberryPi over my laptop or desktop is it's very low power, doesnt make a lot of heat (compared to my laptop or desktop) and I can leave it running for long periods of time without worrying too much about it.
Any suggestions on how I could get started are welcome =)
submitted by TCMStryder to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Miners won't show on my Pi

I got my hands on 3 Block Erupters, a Logilink UA0124 powerid USB hub and wanted to mine on my Raspberry Pi 3.
I followed this guide without problems, until I get to the ls /dev/USB part.
When connected to the Pi it seems like only one of the ports works. If I plug a miner into that port, it shows up: /dev/ttyUSB0 It doesn't matter which of the three miners it is, they all enumerate in that port.
If I have all three miners plugged, they all have a green light shining, and nothing shows up on the Pi. If I then unplug the USB hub from the Pi and plugs it into my main computer running Ubuntu, all three miners show up there.
So all three miners works on my main computer but doesn't enumerate on my Pi. What am i missing?
The hub is of course powered by and external powersupply, 3.5A.
Final update: I had an old very cheap USB hub which surprisingly works. All three miners are now plugging away happily at just shy of one Gigahash. I can't wait for the riches to start accumulating ;)
Update: dmesg output: That did show something:
[41845.871013] usb 1-1.3: new high-speed USB device number 61 using dwc_otg [41845.971969] usb 1-1.3: New USB device found, idVendor=14cd, idProduct=8601 [41845.971989] usb 1-1.3: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=3, SerialNumber=0 [41845.972003] usb 1-1.3: Product: USB 2.0 Hub [41845.972015] usb 1-1.3: Manufacturer: USB Device [41845.974159] hub 1-1.3:1.0: USB hub found [41845.974650] hub 1-1.3:1.0: 4 ports detected [41846.251005] usb 1-1.3.1: new high-speed USB device number 62 using dwc_otg [41846.351944] usb 1-1.3.1: New USB device found, idVendor=14cd, idProduct=8601 [41846.351962] usb 1-1.3.1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=3, SerialNumber=0 [41846.351975] usb 1-1.3.1: Product: USB 2.0 Hub [41846.351988] usb 1-1.3.1: Manufacturer: USB Device [41846.353344] hub 1-1.3.1:1.0: USB hub found [41846.353502] hub 1-1.3.1:1.0: 4 ports detected [41846.431014] usb 1-1.3.3: new full-speed USB device number 63 using dwc_otg [41851.511033] usb 1-1.3.3: device descriptor read/64, error -110 [41866.701111] usb 1-1.3.3: device descriptor read/64, error -110 [41866.891109] usb 1-1.3.3: new full-speed USB device number 64 using dwc_otg [41871.971140] usb 1-1.3.3: device descriptor read/64, error -110 [41887.161224] usb 1-1.3.3: device descriptor read/64, error -110 [41887.351225] usb 1-1.3.3: new full-speed USB device number 65 using dwc_otg [41897.771244] usb 1-1.3.3: device not accepting address 65, error -110 [41897.851240] usb 1-1.3.3: new full-speed USB device number 66 using dwc_otg [41908.271326] usb 1-1.3.3: device not accepting address 66, error -110 [41908.271456] usb 1-1.3-port3: unable to enumerate USB device [41908.351336] usb 1-1.3.1.2: new full-speed USB device number 67 using dwc_otg [41908.431321] usb 1-1.3.1.2: device descriptor read/64, error -71 [41908.541347] dwc_otg: DEVICE:000 : update_urb_state_xfer_intr:1435:trimming xfer length [41908.621307] usb 1-1.3.1.2: device descriptor read/64, error -71 [41908.811296] usb 1-1.3.1.2: new full-speed USB device number 68 using dwc_otg [41908.891293] usb 1-1.3.1.2: device descriptor read/64, error -71 [41909.081294] usb 1-1.3.1.2: device descriptor read/64, error -71 [41909.271296] usb 1-1.3.1.2: new full-speed USB device number 69 using dwc_otg [41909.691299] usb 1-1.3.1.2: device not accepting address 69, error -71 [41909.771299] usb 1-1.3.1.2: new full-speed USB device number 70 using dwc_otg [41910.191301] usb 1-1.3.1.2: device not accepting address 70, error -71 [41910.191384] usb 1-1.3.1-port2: unable to enumerate USB device [41910.271330] usb 1-1.3.4: new full-speed USB device number 71 using dwc_otg [41915.351366] usb 1-1.3.4: device descriptor read/64, error -110 
It's a 7-port hub with three of the ports occupied by the block erupters.
submitted by tamen to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

[SG] Three GAW Furys

I am looking to sell three GAW Miner's 1.4mhs Fury ASICs. All three have been running for the past two months without any issues. I have not overclocked or undervolted or whatever (not smart enough). Mining on PandaPool has been giving me ~200 DGC every 4 hours. pic In the sale I will include TWO usb micro cables, and THREE power supplies. You will need to provide a usb micro cable. I'm not selling the raspberry pi or usb hub in the picture. I'd like to get $100 USD equivalent in Dogecoin or Bitcoin. Shipping from zipcode 83709.
submitted by sawtoothm to dogemarket [link] [comments]

Dr Jally or: How I learned to stop worrying and love the ASIC.

I was a late comer to the bitcoin love, I started mining last summer, nothing major, have never had more than 600Mh/s to my name really... but on a whim I ordered a Jalapeno in late august, and then I tried to put it out of my mind as everyone else fought over if BFL would ever ship or not, etc.... I just figured that worst case, the money was gone really... lo and behold, it arrived about 3 weeks ago, let me briefly share a few things, as some of my tinkering and experiments may benefit others:
This past weekend I opened the little black box of mystery and had some fun:
I plugged everything back in, powered up my host... and noticed my jally was just flashing like crazy and my host couldn't see it. uh-oh. I powered it off, back on, and it was fine. Since then I've powered it off about 10-20 times, and twice it would go into "super fast flash like crazy but not work" mode. Simply unplugging and replugging would solve it. I have not dug into this at all, but I think it's failing to init or pass the boot up tests. There's word around town that you can tweak the firmware to push speed further or reduce the strictness of the tests it does, but I'm happy with what I've got, so I'm leaving it:
Right now
Other than to change coins or work on my host system (now that it's a raspberry pi I don't think I'll be changing it much more), it's been running non-stop at around that rate/temp since the weekend.
Right now my little rPi host is bashing away, with the jally and three block erupters (I know they'll most likely never reach ROI for themselves by themselves, I just wanted to tinker, but still may add a couple more to break 10Gh total just for bonus points), the jally firmware "upgrade" everyone talks about is really designed for one of the other models (the bigger ones), and that's why I think it reports as "BFL 0h" or "BFL 0d" I assume "d" and "h" are the two ASIC spots on the jally board that actually have chips on them in the jally...
I figure all in I'm looking at around... lets say $650 and 90 watts (max) total for ~8.29Gh/s... The erupters really distort my numbers right now, (without them it'd be more like $350 and 80 watts (max) for ~7.3Gh/s)... but again, hashrate is addictive.
The jally power supply has always seemed to run hot to me, even before I pushed the update firmware, so I may try and find a biggebetter quality PS for it, and more erupters will sadly mean I need a new usb hub, as my current one is only rated for 5v 2A, and it has to be close to that with 3 erupters, the pi, and the usb fan. :/ So I guess I've still got more investment to go, but it's just a hobby, I can quit anytime, right?
right?
tl;dr edition (or what I learned, without the story):
submitted by alpha42 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Announcing - MineNinja BeagleBone Bitcoin Mining Platform

Open Source startup CoinNinja (www.coinninja.com) launches its first product geared for miners of the Bitcoin crypto-currency. The MineNinja is a turn-key device for hosting Bitcoin mining hardware, such as ASICs from Butterfly Labs, Avalon, and ASICMiner. With the bitcoin mining market rapidly moving to ASIC devices which provide more Hash power per watt, the MineNinja is the perfect compliment as it further reduces power consumption by eliminating the need for a PC.
"We chose the BeagleBone Black over the Raspberry Pi as it is truly open source. The BeagleBone design is totally open, and that cannot be said about the Pi. Furthermore we found the BeagleBone to be far more reliable, and operating temperatures to be significantly lower.”
Leveraging the power of Open Source development, the MineNinja is a great example of the Maker revolution for innovative small business. The MineNinja is small batch manufactured using the Open Source BeagleBone Black from Texas Instruments and its enclosure is 3D printed on an open source RepRap 3d Printer. The MineNinja is so low-power that it can easily be powered using only a USB port.
"We believe in the Open Source movement, all of our hardware and software is fully open source. We encourage users to make their own MineNinja, everything needed to make your own be easily found in our Github repositiory." - states Alessandro Nardella, Lead Developer at CoinNinja.
The MineNinja leverages existing open source software such as Angstrom Linux, Cgminer and the ANUBIS web front-end to Cgminer. The MineNinja uses the BeagleBone Black without any hardware modifications, which allows users to further refine the product by adding their unique contributions.
The MineNinja BeagleBone Bitcoin miner is available today in limited quantities at www.mineninja.com.
submitted by Coinninja to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Litecoin Cryptocurrency Futurebit Moonlander 2 USB Miner with Raspberry Pi Are USB Bitcoin Miners Profitable RIGHT NOW In 2020? - YouTube DIY Bitcoin Mining: Hardware (part1) - YouTube Working USB Bitcoin Farm with Raspberry Pi running Minera Raspberry Pi 4 Bitcoin Mining For 24 Hours! - YouTube

While understanding each device and its perks and drawbacks, I suggest that the recommendable device or the best USB bitcoin miner to be used would be the Gekkoscience Compac USB stick bitcoin miner as these devices are fast for USB stick miners. As in, 20 GH/s (with tuning) fast. You can get plenty of support in their forums and they even have a few example setups to work with. Reasonable ... If you plan on running more than one Bitcoin miner at the same time, it is best to use a powered USB hub. Take into account the power rating as mining will need a lot of power, as much as one mp per miner. With your USB miner attached to your Raspberry Pi, let’s get everything installed. The Raspberry Pi 2 and especially the Raspberry Pi 3 have more RAM and multi-core processors. While we're still far from modern desktop computers, of course, you're much better off with the current specs than before. That being said, syncing the blockchain can still be quite painful on a Pi 3. With the blockchain growing larger and larger, you basically have two options. One option is to have ... Raspberry Pi in combination with a USB ASIC miner chip makes a good Bitcoin miner (PiMiner) due to its low power usage and ease of configuration. ASIC devices are specialised computing processors specific to the SHA256 algorithm used in Bitcoin hashes. They are much more efficient than pure CPU computations. The Raspberry Pi is a very cheap and efficient way to control and monitor devices ... Build Your Own Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Full Node [Bitcoin Core] Click Here for building Bitcoin XT. LAST UPDATED OCTOBER 8, 2016 Disclaimer: I cannot guarantee these steps will work 100% of the time. Like all DIY tutorials they make assumptions about things and are subject to external libraries and software being updated or changed.

[index] [9092] [46024] [49352] [35687] [19456] [50989] [1763] [23390] [7707] [14288]

Litecoin Cryptocurrency Futurebit Moonlander 2 USB Miner with Raspberry Pi

Get an additional $10 in Bitcoins from Coinbase when purchasing through my referral link http://fredyen.com/get/Bitcoins Raspberry Pi: http://amzn.to/2l6yrW7... How to Setup a Raspberry Pi 2 Bitcoin Mining Rig w/ Bitmain AntMiner U3: https://youtu.be/dPWTSytzN7g Code to copy URL: https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/vi... Complete end product of this video series- A Raspberry Pi imaged with Minera, running GekkoScience Compac and 2Pac USB sticks. Here are the links for the programs- Zipeg- http://www.zipeg.com/ Win32 Disk Imager- https://sourceforge.net/projects/win32diskimager/ Advanced IP Scanner- h... Buy Raspberry Pi 4 Model B 4GB: https://amzn.to/2tlBfGW How to Setup a Raspberry Pi 4 Bitcoin Mining Rig w/ Bitmain AntMiner U3: https://youtu.be/dPWTSytzN7g...

#